What is the Definition of a Defective Product?

What Are Defective Products And In What Ways Do They Become Liabilities For Companies?

You often hear about products being recalled due to certain defects. If not recalled in time, those defects can cause accidents and injuries. Those accidents result in personal injury lawsuits, and huge settlements can be awarded. In the case of a product defect, multiple consumers can be involved in regards to filing civil suits. These types of situations are tragic first and foremost, and they are also huge liabilities for companies that drop the ball so to speak.

When you look at personal injury cases involving defective products, you see all kinds of examples. Any product sold on the market can have a defect of some kind, and not all of them are necessarily going to result in personal injury. What exactly is a product defect? To help you better understand the definition, let’s look at a specific personal injury lawsuit regarding a product defect.

There was a case involving a Chevy Malibu with a defective gas tank. The tank was full of gasoline at the time it was involved in an accident, and six people were inside. The original settlement was for $4.9 billion. In this case, the product defect resulted in personal injury to all six plaintiffs.

Products are designed to work or be used as intended, without defects. Consumers trust manufacturers that the products they purchase are going to be safe. A defective product is one thing, but one whose defect can result in injury is a different story. Most often, you will see information about defective products written in legalese.

Companies whose defective products do not pose safety risks are only liabilities to the companies themselves. Consumers return those products for a refund. A product defect that poses safety risks and results in bodily injury, however, falls into the category of products liability. Companies have to watch out for all types of product defects, lest they are held accountable.